Home Latest News Newsletter Sitemap Contact
 
An introductory theoretical and methodological framework for a Universal Mobility Index (UMI) to quantify, compare and longitudinally track access provision in the built environment of developed and developing countries.

Abstract

Physical disability is common in both developed and developing countries with the incidence predicted to increase dramatically in the next 30 years. Everyone is likely to experience disability at some time in their lifetime suggesting that an inclusive built environment whose facilities are accessible to all the community would be of universal benefit. Including universal design principles into buildings and infrastructure is highly cost effective compared with retrofitting. Yet much urban design and construction continues to present barriers to people with disabilities (PwDs), the injured and ageing, even parents managing prams and small children. While access audits provide some insight into improving equity of access, reports are limited in scope by the brief, multiple levels of responsible authorities and not directly reflective of the wishes of PwDs.Academic literature within three theoretical fields is reviewed: 1) Human Development / Quality of Life and indicators, 2) Models of Disability and 3) Built Environment Access Provision and Policy Making. A new composite human development indicator – the Universal Mobility Index (UMI) – is introduced, projected on the theoretical foundations of the literature reviews in accordance with the World Health Organisation’s International Classification of Functioning Illness and Health. A methodology is developed for the operationalisation of the index. This is tested by gathering a small data sample and proves cogent to the life experience of PwDs surveyed. The UMI comprehensively interlaces at the node formed by the intersection of current understanding of human development, disability and access provision. The Index quantitatively measures, comparatively rates and longitudinally tracks, equity of access. It is the first and only tool that measures the lived experience of physical access across all parts of the built environment; illuminating how barriers to mobility discriminately constrain the autonomy of PwDs to exercise their full human capabilities through denying or restricting participation in community, educational, occupational and many other activities, resulting in oppression and stigmatisation. The UMI empowers PwDs by incorporating their own assessments of barrier severity and prioritisation. A policy environment component scrutinises the inclusion of PwD opinions in the policy making processes affecting the built environment. Adoption of the UMI by government and NGOs can address the fragmented and exclusionary nature of current access considerations across the built environment.

footer
VDD Home
Nike NFL Jerseys Size Chart Nike NFL Jerseys Size Chart Nike NFL Jerseys Size Chart Nike NFL Jerseys Size Chart Nike NFL Jerseys Size Chart Nike NFL Jerseys Size Chart Nike NFL Jerseys Size Chart MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys MLB Baseball Jerseys